We Support Medical Cannabis Research Australia
Aug02

We Support Medical Cannabis Research Australia

Medical Cannabis Reviews & The Hemp Happy network supports the Research, Political Canvassing, Seminars, Activities and the ongoing Education from the “Non -For-Profit”

Medical Cannabis Research

Australia

In February 2016 legislation (Narcotics Amendment Bill 2016) to legalise medical cannabis in Australia passed through federal Australian parliament in record time. It was supported by all sides of politics. This means as at 1 November 2016 Australian patients with certain serious medical conditions and under strict controls will be able to access these products through medical professionals.

Cannabis has been used as a medicine since ancient times. In modern history it was used extensively in pharmacy formulations in the early 19th century.

Cannabis used as a medicine has made a resurgence in recent years and is now legal in a number of parts of the world. Whilst anecdotal cases are plentiful scientific studies are still being undertaken to determine the effectiveness in certain disease states. The main ones we are studying below:

Multiple Sclerosis

Epilepsy

Nausea in Cancer Chemotherapy and AIDS patients

Pain Relief in Terminal Cancer patients

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder patients

Medical Cannabis Research Australia was established in December 2016 by Paul and Sharlene Mavor and Tony Hume.

Paul Mavor is a pharmacist and has practiced for over 26 years in WA and owned a number of pharmacies. He has an interest in the pharmacokinetics of different cannabis dosage forms.

Sharlene Mavor is a medical scientist with majors in Microbiology, Virology and Biotechnology. She has worked in a number of laboratories both in Western Australia and in the UK. Sharlene has a particular interest in different cannabis strains, potency and purity testing and extraction methods.

tony hume

Tony Hume is an experienced fund raiser and has a diverse background in education, health and philanthropy. He is a graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Director’s course and is accredited as a Certified Fundraising Executive (CFRE) world-wide. Tony also is an Independent Director for the Yinhawangka people in the Eastern Pilbara region. He is passionate about positive community impact and making connections in the community to maximise peoples’ opportunities.

Medical Cannabis Research Australia is committed to improve the lives of Australian persons and families by reducing the suffering, prevalence and impact of a variety of diseases through the use of medical cannabis. This will be achieved with a focus on clinical trials and ethical supply of medical cannabis. Research will be conducted to support and promote public awareness for the use of medical cannabis including education for clinical practitioners with new treatment options, both locally and globally for their patients. We aim to educate and advise health professionals, patients, their families and carers in the use of medical cannabis through media, education and fund raising campaigns and further cooperate with government and likeminded organisations in order to advance the research, treatments, equity and quality of life which can be assisted with the use of medical cannabis.

News:

Clinical Studies are underway in several states of Australia

These are largely government sponsored

NSW – terminal cancer – vaporised THC vs THC+CBD

-paediatric epilepsy – cannabidivarin, CBD

-Chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting – THC + CBD
QLD – cannabis oil in paediatric epilepsy

ACT – cannabis for melanoma

Vic – paediatric epilepsy – synthetic cannabidiol

Activities include:

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Evidence Found: Ancient Marijuana Use
Feb15

Evidence Found: Ancient Marijuana Use

marijuana-use-historyN.B: Both articles are reused from news articles online and are unchanged.

Albany (NY) Times Union, 20 May 1993

The first physical evidence that marijuana was used as a medicine in the ancient Mideast was reported Wednesday by Israeli scientists who found residue of the drug with the skeleton of a girl who apparently died in childbirth 1,600 years ago.

The researchers said the marijuana probably was used by a mid-wife trying to speed the birth, as well as ease the pain.

Until now, the researchers wrote in a letter to the journal Nature, “physical evidence of cannabis (marijuana) use in the ancient Middle East has not yet been obtained.”

The seven researchers — from Hebrew University, the Israel Antiquities Authority and the National Police Headquarters forensic division — said references to marijuana as a medicine are seen as far back as 1,600 B.C. in Egyptian, Assyrian, Greek and Roman writings.  But physical evidence that the hemp weed, cannabis sativa, was used for that purpose has been missing.

The researchers’ examination of an undisturbed family tomb near Jerusalem dating to the fourth century AD indicated the girl, about 14, died because her pelvis was too small to permit normal birth.

First-Medical-rec-nungzunWorlds Oldest Marijuana Stash Found:

A tomb in a remote part of China has revealed the oldest stash of weed to be discovered to date.

The cache is over 2,700 years old and was buried alongside an apparent shaman. It’s rare but not uncommon for bodies/mummies in China to be found having blonde hair and blue eyes, in short, of seemingly western origin, which this one seemed to be. Such mummies usually came from the Gushi culture, near Turpan in northwestern China.

This particular mummy was buried with what was found to be, a 789 gram stash of marijuana which was still green although had lost its unique odour.

“To our knowledge, these investigations provide the oldest documentation of cannabis as a pharmacologically active agent,” says a newly published paper, whose lead author was American neurologist Dr. Ethan B. Russo.

history-of-medical-marijuana-3-728Many ancient Egyptian and Greek sites have also offered evidence of marijuana use in ye olden times yet this one, recently discovered, is the oldest discovered and, it seems, was purposely cultivated for pharmacological use.

“The 18 researchers, most of them based in China, subjected the cannabis to a battery of tests, including carbon dating and genetic analysis. Scientists also tried to germinate 100 of the seeds found in the cache, without success.

history-of-medical-marijuana-5-728Researchers also could not determine whether the cannabis was smoked or ingested, as there were no pipes or other clues in the tomb of the shaman, who was about 45 years old.”

The region of China where the tomb is located, Xinjiang, is considered an original source of many cannabis strains worldwide.

happy-420-stoned-marijuana-5

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